The wedding at Cana
Sermon / January 20, 2019

John 2:1-11 This is the first miracle of Jesus as recorded in the Gospel according to St. John. The first chapter established that Jesus is the Word made flesh, God incarnate. He then proceeds to call disciples to himself and begin his ministry. The story we heard today begins with the words, “On the third day…” This is a hint of the greatest miracle to come, his resurrection on the third day of his blessed passion. On this day, the Lord’s Day, we celebrate that miracle as he changes ordinary wine into his sacred blood. The miracle we remember from Cana is that he changed ordinary water into extraordinary wine. Jesus and his disciples were invited to the wedding feast, and his mother is there, as well. Mary notices that the wine had failed, meaning it had failed to last through the entire feast. Notice what she says to Jesus; “They have no wine.” She does not say, “Jesus, run to the store and buy more wine.” That is something my own mother might say to me! Instead Mary just makes the observation that they have no more wine. Jesus knows what that means. It would be a huge embarrassment…

The Baptism of our Lord Jesus
Sermon / January 13, 2019

Today we commemorate the Baptism of our Lord Jesus. Why did Jesus need to be baptized? He certainly had no sin to be cleansed. He knew that he was one with God the Father and God the Spirit. In fact, we know from the Scripture we heard this morning that the Father claimed him and pronounced his pleasure in his Son: In verse 22, we read, “…the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form, as a dove, and a voice came from heaven, “Thou art my beloved Son; with thee I am well pleased.” Claiming a son as his own is what a father does. Jesus continues to call God his Father during his life on the earth, and taught us to address him as Father when we pray. St. Paul confirmed it, writing to the Galatians; “Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.”” This has been orthodoxy for a little less than 2000 years, and is likely to stay that way despite the misguided attempts of those who have no imagination. So, why did Jesus need to be baptized? In verse 23, which…

The Epiphany
Sermon / January 6, 2019

Today is the feast of the Epiphany of our Lord. It is one of the principal feasts of the Church. As we heard in the Gospel today, three wise men came from the East to find the new born king. We three kings of Orient are… Who were these wise men? The Greek word that is translated here as wise men, is “Magoi” which became the English word “Magi.” That word can be translated as “magician” in other places, like the Acts of the Apostles, where a certain magician contended against Paul while he was on the island of Cyprus. He was also called a Jewish false prophet. So while we have this rather positive view of the wise men, the Magi, who followed the star in the East to see the new born king, we have this rather negative view of other magi who are sorcerers and false prophets. To me it says that our Father in heaven will use anyone who is open to being led by the Holy Spirit. It is also said that these wise men were astrologers, those who could read the signs in the stars and the planets. Their assistants who actually tracked the…